Road to Mental Health

1. Get Help in a Crisis

Get Help in a Crisis

If you or a loved one are thinking of killing yourself, call:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 800-273-TALK

If you think someone is a danger to themselves or others

CALL 911

When you call 911 tell them this is a mental health crisis and provide needed information.

When 1st responders arrive, share the information you gave 911, remain calm, and step aside so the 1st responders can do their job.

If there is no danger, but you need immediate help, call the crisis line for your county

King County 866-427-4747 Pierce County 800-576-7764 Veteran Crisis Line 800-273-8255

To talk with someone who has lived with mental illness, call

WA State Warm Line 877-500-WARM Pierce County 877-780-5222
NAMI National Helpline 800-950-6264 LGBTQ Support: 866-488-7386

What Is CIT?

A Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program is a model for community policing that brings together law enforcement, mental health providers, hospital emergency departments and individuals with mental illness and their families to improve responses to people in crisis. CIT programs enhance communication, identify mental health resources for assisting people in crisis and ensure that officers get the training and support that they need.

To date Rainier Foothills Wellness Foundation has trained over 175 local first responders, police, and park rangers.

Communication techniques with Aggressive, Mentally Ill and Emotionally Disturbed Individuals

  • Verbal de-escalation training for police, fire, hospital staff and corrections
  • Learn skills to quickly establish communication & minimize risk of violence
  • Learn skills to recognize patterns of behaviors & strategies to improve cooperation
  • Learn strategies that enhance physical control techniques if needed

Register for our Crisis Intervention Training class

2. Learn About Mental Illness

Learn About Mental Illness

There are steps you can take to better advocate for yourself or your loved one.

Become your own expert. It will be a lengthy journey nding what therapies work for you, what meds you will need, and what doesn’t work for you. Don’t give up.

Seek treatment for any drug or alcohol addictions.

Understand the di erent types of health care providers, and the services they can provide.

rfwellnessfoundation.org/types

Build your healthcare team, your primary care provider, mental health professionals, family, and friends.

Learn about your medications.

rfwellnessfoundation.org/meds

Learn how to navigate the mental health care system.

It’s recommended to keep a personal journal with critical information; such as diagnosis, meds, hospitalization dates, insights, obser- vations, and provider contact information.

Resources:

NAMI Info Line: 800-950-NAMI (6264) or info@nami.org
Teen Link Help Line: 866-TEENLINK WA Recovery Help Line: 866-789-1511 A Common Voice: 253-537-2145

Helpful classes we provide:
NAMI F2F and Crisis Intervention Training

3. Navigate the Mental Health System

Navigate the Mental Health System

Telling your story to your health care provider, and sharing what you are feeling, is crucial to you or your loved ones recovery.

If you have insurance you need to check with the insurance company to nd out which providers in your area you can see and what services are covered.

The easiest way to obtain this information is to call the number on the back of your insurance card.

Understand your rights. According to the law, services for mental illness and substance use disorders must be comparable to physical health care. This a ects co-pay costs, number of visits covered, prior authorization, and other items. You have the right to appeal a claim. To learn more, call.

rfwellnessfoundation.org/parity

Be assertive and don’t give up.

It may take awhile, but once your mental health care team is in place you are on the road to recovery.

If you are eligible for Medicaid, many providers can help you apply for bene ts.

Providers:

Valley Cities: 253-939-4055 Enumclaw Youth: 360-825-4586 Comprehensive Life: 253-396-5800 Multicare: 888-445-8120

4. Advocate

Advocate

Telling your story to your health care provider, sharing what you are feeling, is crucial to you or your loved ones recovery.

Talk to your provider. Many people who are in crisis see a primary care provider. Often the person only shares the physical symptoms they are experiencing, and not the emotional and/or psychological symptoms. The more you share, the better the provider can treat you.

Tell your provider if you are not sleeping; if you are hearing voices; or if at times you feel hyperactive and cannot turn o your thoughts. Are you using drugs or alcohol to reduce your symptoms? The more you share, the better the provider can treat you.

If you are thinking of killing yourself, or even if you believe not waking up one morning would release you from the pain, tell your provider this so he or she can work with you to start a care plan that will get you on the road to recovery.

If you have concerns about your loved one, nothing keeps you from sharing valuable information. HIPAA does prevent the provider from sharing personal patient information, but HIPAA laws don’t prevent you from sharing your observations. Go ahead and write a letter or call the provider. Explain that you just want to share what you are seeing or hearing. The best option for sharing information, is to have your loved one sign a confidentiality release.

Helpful classes we provide: 

NAMI F2F and Crisis Intervention Training

5. Move Forward in Recovery

Move Forward in Recovery

Recovery Is a process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self- directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. Key to wellness is understanding what works for you, what doesn’t work and knowing the triggers that make you feel worse; such as stress, substance use or lack of sleep.

Reaching your full potential: Emotional & Social: Being able to cope with

life and creating satisfying relationships. Surround yourself with people that promote your wellness. Develop a sense of connection, belonging and a well developed support.

Environmental: Just as people can add to your wellness, so can the places we live & work. Find places that promote your wellness.

Financial & Occupational Security:

Sometimes fulltime employment is not an option for people living with serious mental illness. Consider supportive employment, or find an employer who will accommodate your needs. If unable to work, consider volunteering; Getting out and giving back helps.

Intellectual: Be creative and find ways to learn and grow.

Spiritual: Expand a sense of purpose and meaning in life. For some, this can be church and faith-based support. For others, this can be a 12-step program.

Helpful classes we provide: 

NAMI F2F and Crisis Intervention Training

6. Take Care of Yourself

Take Care of Yourself

You cannot take care of someone else without taking care of yourself.

Determine who comforts you

  • Spend free time with people who lift you up.
  • Keep them abreast of your loved one’s care plan.
  • Consider joining a support group.

Therapy for yourself

  • Meeting with a professional for talk therapy can increase your resiliency in caring for your loved one.
  • Keep your own personal journal.

Learn what refuels you

  • Take a walk, garden, go to the mall, watch a movie, meditate and exercise.
  • Identify when you’ve reach your max and make plans to care for yourself.
  • Take care of your spiritual needs.

Consider Respite Care

Books:

  • An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Red eld Jamison.
  • I Am Not Sick, I Don’t Need Help by Dr. Xavier Amador 10th edition.

Helpful classes we provide: 

NAMI F2F and Crisis Intervention Training

Testimonial Video

Brochure
About & History

The Mental Health Task Force was established on the plateau in June 2011.  The need for addressing mental health concerns came from the feedback received from community members who attended the Health Summits offered by Rainier Foothills Wellness Foundation. Feedback from the summits has resulted in many initiatives lead by the Foundation with the Mental Health Task Force the Foundation’s latest initiative.  The Mental Health Task Force is a volunteer group representing community leaders, the youth center, the senior center, mental health professionals, health care providers, individuals and business professionals working together at the local level to address mental health concerns. Currently this group of active volunteers is addressing the following initiatives:

  1. Seeking ways to provide community awareness and education regarding mental health issues, especially as it pertains to their part of the community (schools, health care providers, police, churches, etc.).
  2. Seeking and facilitating additional services that might be brought into the community to address mental health issues.
  3. Researching and even requesting appropriate grants and funding sources.
Mental Health Resources

YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID

Youth Mental Health First Aid is designed to teach parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, school staff, peers, neighbors, health and human services workers, and other caring citizens how to help an adolescent (age 12-18) who is experiencing a mental health or addictions challenge or is in crisis. Youth Mental Health First Aid is primarily designed for adults who regularly interact with young people.

What does QPR mean?

  • Q – Question
  • P – Persuade
  • R – Refer

The 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.
Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Each year thousands of Americans, like you, are saying “Yes” to saving the life of a friend, colleague, sibling, or neighbor.
QPR can be learned in our Gatekeeper course in as little as one hour.

What is a Gatekeeper?

According to the Surgeon General’s National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2001), a gatekeeper is someone in a position to recognize a crisis and the warning signs that someone may be contemplating suicide.
Gatekeepers can be anyone, but include parents, friends, neighbors, teachers, ministers, doctors, nurses, office supervisors, squad leaders, foremen, police officers, advisors, caseworkers, firefighters, and many others who are strategically positioned to recognize and refer someone at risk of suicide.
As a QPR-trained Gatekeeper you will learn to:

  • Recognize the warning signs of suicide
  • Know how to offer hope
  • Know how to get help and save a life

Join us at our free classes to learn more: NAMI F2F and Crisis Intervention Training

NAMI (National Alliance for Mental Illness) Family-to-Family

…is a free, 12-session education program for family, partners, friends and significant others of adults living with mental illness. The course is designed to help all family members understand and support their loved one living with mental illness, while maintaining their own well-being. The course includes information on illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and other mental health conditions. Thousands of families describe the program as life-changing. The program is taught by trained teachers who are also family members and know what it is like to have a loved one living with mental illness. The class is open to all families living on the Enumclaw/Buckley Plateau.

Participant Perspectives

“This course overall was the single most, without a doubt, helpful and informative thing ever offered in all my years searching for answers… It has helped me to understand better and communicate more effectively with my brother.”
“The course has helped me to realize that my son is still inside the body that is often times hidden by the mental illness and that I am not alone in this.”

Classes are available, free of charge, and offered twice a year. Please register here.

Crisis Intervention Training

What Is CIT?

A Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program is a model for community policing that brings together law enforcement, mental health providers, hospital emergency departments and individuals with mental illness and their families to improve responses to people in crisis. CIT programs enhance communication, identify mental health resources for assisting people in crisis and ensure that officers get the training and support that they need.
To date Rainier Foothills Wellness Foundation has trained over 175 local first responders, police, and park rangers.

  • Communication techniques with Aggressive, Mentally Ill and Emotionally Disturbed Individuals
  • Verbal de-escalation training for police, fire, hospital staff and corrections
  • Learn skills to quickly establish communication & minimize risk of violence
  • Learn skills to recognize patterns of behaviors & strategies to improve cooperation
  • Learn strategies that enhance physical control techniques if needed

The next CIT Training will be in early 2017, look for save the date coming soon.

Mental Health First Aid Classes

Just as CPR helps you assist an individual having a heart attack, even if you have no clinical training, Mental Health First Aid helps you assist someone experiencing a mental health related crisis. In the Mental Health First Aid course, you learn risk factors and warning signs for mental health and addiction concerns, strategies for how to help someone in both crisis and non-crisis situations, and where to turn for help.

Adult Mental Health First Aid

The adult Mental Health First Aid course is appropriate for anyone 18 years and older who wants to learn how to help a person who may be experiencing a mental health related crisis or problem. Topics covered include anxiety, depression, psychosis, and addictions.

Edgework Training

Awards

Community Building Mental Health Grant

In June of 2014 the Foundation was awarded a three year $182,000 dollar grant from Catholic Health Initiatives and Franciscan Health Systems to further the efforts of improving mental health in our communities. The grant has three main goals that were founded on the needs identified from the Mental Health Summit.

  1. Improve community members’ access to locally available mental health treatment and support services.
  2. Build mental health literacy and skills among providers and community members who work with people experiencing mental health problems.
  3. Increase mental health literacy, knowledge of mental health resources and gatekeeper skills among the broader community. Gatekeepers are people in the community who are able to assist people in distress to access appropriate professional services.

Work to achieve these goals began in September of 2014.

Join Our Classes

Classes are available, free of charge, to your groups. To schedule a class, contact the Rainier Foothills Wellness Foundation at 360-802-3206 or email shellyp@rfwellnessfoundation.org

Or explore the invaluable classes we offer.

Join the Task Force

The Mental Health Task Force meets every second Thursday of the month from
8:30 AM – 10 AM AM at the
Green River Community College,
1414 Griffin Ave., Enumclaw.

For more information, please contact Shelly Pricco at 360-802-3206 or shellyp@rfwellnessfoundation.org